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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
to world war i. it was going to come through belgium along the channel coast, and down into paris. buddy had to completely rearrange that andy came up with the idea -- one of his generals -- to think through belgium but send the majority of his armored power through the ardennes forest further south and come further behind any french and british armies that went to belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10, 1940.s? and the british and the frenchv did what the germans expected. as soon as the germans when into belgium, the french and the british went out, the armored divisions came in behind, and forced really the cream of the french army and the british expeditionary force up to the port of dunkirk. that's what we know as the evacuation of dunkirk. speak before you go any further, when did the british come across the channel into france? >> i think they must have done this maybe even as early as 1938, but certainly after war in 1939 started. they put the british army next to the french in anticipation of the germans coming. of course, vineland through the
close to the land and its people. but as a young man in paris, he joined th friends like max ernst and jean arp in the emerging surrealist movement of the 1920s. in his painting "the farm," miro's characteristic symbols and themes began to appear: serpentine shapes, checkerboard patterns, infinite space represented by the moon or a star. in 1922, he painted "the farmer's wife," the ancestress of countless female symbols that also became a continuing motif in miro's art. in 1924, his art broke free of gravitational constraints in the surrealistic world of "harlequin's carnival." over the years, he developed his own personal symbolism, and in the 1950s, the scale of his art grew with such works as a mural at harrd university and "the wall ofhe sun" for unesco in pas. as his work grew in size, miro continued what he termed "a process of simplification." he stated, "little by little, i have managed to reach a point at which i use no more than a small number of forms and colors." this process found a culminating expression in his eightoot-high painting "femme," miro entered the project
a cousin who had been in the women's army corps during world war ii. and she went to paris, and she bought this painting. she is a cat lover. and she paid a few hundred dollars for it. and she was told that it was extremely valuable. and this was in the 1940s? yes, mm-hmm. and i'm not a cat lover. so it's been on my porch for 15 years. and what do you know about it? i know that he was a contemporary of toulouse-lautrec, that he was swiss, and he came to paris in 1881, and he is more noted for his posters. the artist's name is théophile steinlen. and you're absolutely right. he was a contemporary and a friend of toulouse-lautrec's, also a famous poster artist. he was born in switzerland, and in his early 20s, he moved to paris. and he's first working in paris in the 1880s as an illustrator, and soon after that as a poster artist. he did a number of images of workers, and very much had a social agenda in imaging poor people, downtrodden people. but what he's best known for are his posters of parisian nightclubs and theater programs and, of course, the beloved cats. and most of his models ar
arrives in paris, the master who was already there, robert livingston who was approached, and he says essentially, how would you guys like to buy the entire territory of louisiana. livingston, it's not surprising, he said, yes, let's do this. they negotiate. the embassy arrives, complete the negotiation. >> host: that's james monroe. >> guest: who would become madison's secretary of state, and then would become madison's success sore as president. we have in the room a bunch of people almost who -- who would be president or almost president or thoroughly evaluated. they complete the negotiations. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they have bigger problems than they have with the united states. they want the cash. >> host: louisiana was a white elephant. >> guest: they think that the united states gets louisiana. it's too far away, and they with too consumed to protect it. he says, amazingly, with the foresight that gives him the reputation for, you know, genius of mixed ethical quality, but remarkable intellectual abilities, a says a century from now, it could make them
close to the land and its people. but as a young man in paris, he joined with friends like max ernst and jean arp in the emeing surrealist movement of the 1920s. in his painting "the farm," miro's characteristic symbols and themes began to appear: serpenne shapes, checkeoard patterns, finite space represented by the moon or a star. in 1922, he painted "the farmer's wife," the ancestress of countless female symbols that also became a continuing motif in miro's art. in 1924, his art broke free of gravitational constraints in theurrealtic world of "harleqn's carnival." over the years, he developed his own personal symbolism, and in the 1950s, the scal his art grew with such works as a mural at harvard university and "the wall ofhe sun" for unesco in pas. as his work grew in size, miro continued what he termed "a process of simplification." he stated, "little by little, i have managed to reach a point at which i use no more than a small number of forms and colors." this process found a culminating expression the maquette for the tial gallery's tapestry. miro entered the project with much
their own. my grandmother then raised her family in the city and watched as the paris of the orient transformed into an american town with the add vent of the american troops. eager to explore new lands again, my grandmother did not need convincing to leave in 1975, and beautiful daughter, my mother, and her sister here today, had no choice but to follow among. once the parents decided that the whole family had to escape, the next step was to gather all the children and belongings and locate a safe passage out. it was no easy task because as you recall, i said i had eight elder brothers and sisters. moreover, the first attempt failed. after waiting two hours at the agreed upon rendezvous sight, the helicopter never showed. my dad found out later when we were safe in the united states that his cousin actually ran out of fuel and had to return to the air base. at this point, my paternal uncle set out to find another means of escape while the rest us of returned home to await word. our second and successful attempt of fleeing came by sea. when my uncle phoned us with the good news he s
thoughts and how you found the paris peace conference was specifically causing -- the 20th century and number two, why did you choose the -- on the cover of your book? >> number one perhaps next to the new deal the first high conference was one of the worst things of the 20th century and gives us an essence world war ii. it not only is bad from the standpoint of destroying national entities by moving people around and putting us in a situation where there is going to be inevitable conflict. that is one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collective security is obviously the league of nations is a monstrous failure. in terms of the flagraising on sarah bocce, it just seems very symbolic that is the flag goes up americans are rising to the point of promise. sempre fi. >> thank you, larry. [applause] and is noted we do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them. we have an additional conversation on the panel table as well. we thank you all for your kind attention and hope to see you again soon in the future. we are dismissed. ..
at the olympic council. number one, your thoughts on how profound the paris peace conference was, specifically carving up the rest of the 20th century. and number two, why did you choose the flag raising -- [inaudible] >> number one, perhaps next to the new deal the for psycho but this one of the worst things of the 20th century. it not only is back from the standpoint of destroying national entities by moving people around and putting them in a situation where there's going to be inevitable conflict. that is one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collect security because obviously league of nations is a demonstrative failure. in terms of the flag raising on sir bocce, it just seemed very symbolic that the flag is set america's startup of this racing. semper fi. >> any other questions? thank you, larry. >> thank you. [applause] >> and most notably do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them, have additional conversation on the panel table appears well. we thank you for your kind attention and hope you see you in the future. >> for more information, visit the a
of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 bucks -- books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the dutch federation. jefferson was not there. he did get his hands on a copy very quickly of the constitution. we e-mail the copy for him over in paris. he said, where is the bill of rights? the answer was, there is no bill of rights. every people on earth is untitled by nature -- entitled by nature to a constant -- to a bill of rights which protect them against their government. this foreshadowed a problem. george mason was one of the members of the virginia delegation. he had written the declaration of the rights for the state of virginia in 1776. it was a few months before jefferson wrote the declaration of independence. when the convention was over, mason, who was a member of the virginia delegation, was greeted would not sign the constitution. washington was -- was -- was a member of the virginia delegation, would not sign the co
. giving up some of these gains. ftse 100 up 0.4%. xetra dax half a percent. sp spain and paris in green. greek almost down 2% with greek bank stocks leading the way lower. dallas fisher said the u.s. central bank must set limits on its monetary policy. the hawkish fisher warned the size of the fed asset purchase program is abnormal saying he opposes an extension of operation twist. the latest s&p case shiller index due later today is expected to show continued improvement for home prices in 20 major u.s. cities. providing further evidence of a long term rebound for the sector or sdw does it. our next guest is eric glean, chief of u.s. rates research and strategy at td securities. paul dale is also still with us. eric, good morning. first to you. tell us why you're concerned the housing recovery might not be for real. >> well, we have seen fits and starts in this recovery. i do think it is for really. we won't be seeing an upward move, but there are encouraging signs. we're seeing home prices improve across most regions of the company. inventories on a monthly basis are half of what they
thoughts on how profound the paris peace conference was, specifically carving up the map on the rest of the 20th century. and then, number two, why did you choose the flag raising on the cover of your book? >> number one, perhaps next to the new deal, the versailles conference is one of the worst things that the 20th century gives us, in essence, word war ii. -- world war ii, and it not only is bad from the standpoint of destroying national entities, by moving people around and putting them in a situation where there's going to be inevitable conflict, that's one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collective security because, obviously, league of nations is a monstrous fail whereure. in terms of the flag raising oner is batch chi, it just seemed very symbolic that as the flag goes up, america's stock in the world was rising to this point of prominence. semper fi. >> any other questions? thank you, larry. [applause] >> thank you. >> and, as noted, we do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them, have additional conversation up here on the panel table as
for skiers and snow to orders heavenly who is actually open today. squaw valley and kirkwood kickoff paris he said. check out the conditions that-kickoff their season-and at heavenly they are also showing some decent amounts. there are multiple chair lifts and trails open to the people that do not make their own like donner pass, are hoping to start making some after thanksgiving which will depend on the next 1.5 weeks and months snowfall depend on [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow, you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah blah blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no. we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver only from at&t u-verse. get a free wireless receiver with a qualifying u-verse plan. rethink possible. not 80% are showing that this is the reelection no -- we encourage you to wait until our face
to berlin to paris, "half-blood blues" is esi edugyan's story of an afro german trumpet player and his band called the hot time swingers is in 1939 for occupied paris arrested by the nazis for the crime of being in africa german jazz musician. degenerate both by birth because he's one of the masters so-called produced by the unions of german women and french colonial soldiers after world war i and degenerate by choice because they considered jazz to be a degenerate art form, a quote on quote, jewish property. think about that. it's a figure of the novel which has been praised to the heavens which is a little exposed, i'm sorry, uses a little exposed corner of the african diaspora to address the themes of creativity as relations to the other and the very nature of those historical memory and historical discourse. the novel was powered not only by its flights from place to place and from person-to-person, but also, and i would say most impressively by esi edugyan's use of black vernacular language, the common language spoken by people has covered african-american fiction for more than a centu
. adams was the american minister to the court of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the dutch federation. jefferson was not there. he did get his hands on a copy very quickly of the constitution. we e-mailed a copy for him over in paris. he said, where is the bill of rights? the answer was, there is no bill of rights. every people on earth is entitled by nature to a bill of rights which protect them against their government. this foreshadowed a problem. george mason was one of the members of the virginia delegation. he had written the declaration of the rights for the state of virginia in 1776. it was a few months before jefferson wrote the declaration of independence. when the convention was over, mason, who was a member of the virginia delegation, was a member of the virginia delegation, would not sign the constitution. washington was infuriated. so came about one of the great in
to flee the country because of the high income tax increase. stephane has more in paris. as we look at some pictures, how has this gone down in the rest of france? are they viewing this as a criticism of the french tax system or of him? >> it's all about francois hollande. he explained the policy of the government, including fiscal policy. there's not much room for depardieu this morning. but it's not a big surprise. it's one less paying taxes in france as a result of the new tax policy implemented by the socialist government. it's a report from the belgium newspaper, which is reporting that gerard depardieu brought a property in a small village located just by the french border, and plans to escape the tax implemented by the government. the mayor of the village was unable to confirm that gerard depardieu bought a home in the village. it wouldn't be surprising, though, because this small village already has a 27% french population. it's not glamorous like london, geneva or even monaco, but it would be the place to pay less taxes and being close to french border. he earned two millio
. the first children's hospital was founded in 18 02 in paris. they've recognized then that children were not the same as adults. why are we ostriches and have our head in the stand? you could excuse it up until the end of the second world war. people went straight from school and work probably of the age of 14 and there was no choice. there was not at and between group. since the '50s, since all this, -- elvis, since my age group, what is the bloody excuse? [laughter] all i can say is, i think this is something you will do in your country very quickly, because what i love about america is the thing, we can do this, we will do it, we will make it work and we will donate. these are your teenagers. they need your support. they are your community and they are your future. you deserve to have it better. [applause] >> i just have one or two. what inspired you to set up the teenager and young adult cancer center? why there? >> mainly because i was doing a charity show and someone's back garden. rebecca was doing it for autism. and another teenage program. at that party dr. david feinberg, in c
. this year the windows show a brief film, minnie imagining herself at the fashion shows in paris, and with a little pixie dust, she's transported to the runway. even style maven sarah jessica parker gets the cartoon treatment. >> by the way you have beautiful ears. >> oh, thank you. >> reporter: she was there for the unveiling with our boss, disney ceo bob iver. sjp weighing in on the controversial skinny minnie. >> but it's a fantasy. we imagine ourselves in a scenario much different from our own, fashion magazines and fashion has the saime aspirational quality. >> reporter: iver hopes it serves as a way to keep the characters on the cutting edge of style. >> we're presenting the marriage between disney characters and high fashion and proves that great character is kind of timeless and always in style. >> reporter: and it's for a good cause as 25% of the proceeds of the disney/barney's holiday fashion line will go to the red cross to help victims of hurricane sandy. and fear not, disney devotees. as with all fairy-tales, this story also has a happy ending. paula faris, abc news,
. right here. >> from paris. i wanted to ask the panelists what do you think of china's plan for solutions for syria? china came out recently with a four-point plan. do you take this seriously? if so, could it be part of the new normal? china looking at a crisis that the west is unable to solve, far from its shores saying we have a position to take, and we can play a role in this? >> run to the back run. right, this gentleman here. hand up high. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> thank you, richard downey. early in the discussion, you asked about the islands, the dispute, and your response was that the china -- the chinese response was part of a long term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build infrastructure to gain access to raw materials. at the same time, we've also seen them make tremendous efforts to build military to military relations, and my question for the panel is is that military dimension just an effort to protect their economic interests, or is it some part of a long term plan to help lay fo
ads comparing him to paris hilton. the partly because it was mostly the standard democratic agenda of reversing the bush era and investing in the future. obama cares a lot about policy, but it's not really a policy entrepreneur in the original campaign wasn't really about new ideas. it's about that that message of change and then this aspirational, we can believe in addendum, the same but maybe this guy would follow through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose mi
out buttons. >> i wasn't, but i was in paris and i went to abercrombie & fitch. and by the way, the store is unbelievable. unbelievable inside. >> bunch of freaks standing in line. weird looking people. >> because you walk and then they have models standing there without shirts on. >> weird-looking dudes and all young. maybe it's because they're young, that's why they look weird to me. revenue was $1.17 billion versus -- that's a big beat, though. and the guidance, 250 to 2.75, above where expectations were. that's a nice rebound. it had be been back in the 50s. and cisco reported 48 cents a share, 2 cents ahead of expectations, revenue was 11.88 billion, that was above expectations, as well, and that stock's getting a little bit of traction, still below 20. >>> still to come this morning, we do have breaking economic news, retail sales and ppi numbers coming out at 8:30. we'll get the numbers and tell you what they say about the upcoming holiday shopping season. >>> plus, venture capital meets the fiscal cliff. the man behind starters like tumblr and how technology companies a
the estate tax. i would like to see the estate tax come back. i do not think paris hilton should inherit her parents will wealth. the estate tax has been part of american economics for almost 100 years, republicans and democrats have been for it. it is not socialism. it is part of the american way of doing things. let's get to those compromises which are out there. i think we will get an amt patch, and medicare passed for doctors, some closing of loopholes. i will like to see a radical simplification of our tax code but i do not see it happening. i think that would be too much to ask. on foreign-policy, i think we will see more interesting things. we will get out of afghanistan. that does not take a genius to predict that. but i see an opening to cuba. -- under this president, pretty soon. i think it will start this year. it is not going to be the kind of rabid, you are a communist opposition that has kept american presidents from doing that. some of the most interesting thing to watch after this election we did what happens with israeli american relations? benjamin netanyahu did something i
on a flight to paris. >> think i'm running on a little bit of adrenaline right now. >> reporter: no time for the eiffel tower, only an hour before leaving for salt lake city, another 12 hours in the air. >> 54 1/2 hours in. >> reporter: we caught up with him in utah where there was one flight to go, salt lake to baltimore. in all howie traveled a mind-blowing 14,000 miles and with elite bonuses he's earned 30,000 plus, enough to propel him to delta's diamond level in 2013 and he'll eventually to use those miles to travel for free. >> there are hundreds of thousands of people that do this. >> reporter: howie blogs about his travel tricks and says the online forum on flyertalk.com is a treasure trove for extreme frequent flyers who constantly monitor new fares for low cost long hauls. >> we're trying to beat the system. been to 65 different countries using these techniques. >> reporter: the frugal travel guy hosts seminars on how to travel on the cheap, like the atlanta to honolulu trip he took with wife kate for $152 round trip. >> he loves the game. he loves the chase. >> reporter: and c
for the rest of us. >> reporter: in paris they voted with their palates piggott an obama burger against a romney omelette and the town in japan declared obama for obama and in kenya where obama's father is from women have been giving thai newborns, the latest michelle obama, brian obama. >> we are now extremely excited. we are happy. >> reporter: in a village of kogelo his step-grandmother sarah said he's worked hard. people on the rest of this planet celebrating their vote for ones they couldn't cast. world markets also responded positively this morning, and only hours after winning his next term, obama got his first order of foreign business courtesy of british prime minister david cameron saying he wants obama's help to do more to protect the people of syria, put more pressure on the assad regime and assist the rebels. savannah. >> just one in a long to-do list for the president. thanks, michelle. >>> coming up next, big issue in the election, jobs. how to find them no matter what your age. but first this is "today" on nbc. ♪ ♪ we were skipping stones ♪ and letting go ♪ over
martin, coordinator of tea pary patriots. >> for those of us that believe that america is founded is the greatest country in the history of the world we wanted someone would fight for us. we wanted a fighter like ronald reagan that boldly championed america's founding principles who inspired millions of independence and ronald reagan democrats to join us and the idea that america was founded was the shining city upon a hill. will we got was a week moderate candidate hand-picked by the beltway elites in the country, the establishment of the republican party. the presidential loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss of the republican elite handpicked candidates, the tea party is the last best hope america has to restore her founding principles. while that may take longer to restore these principles with president obama back in office, we are not going away. it took nearly 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than three and a half years to restore our constitution. we are going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution, and w
. it is ridiculous. we are in 2012. the first children's hospital was founded in 18 02 in paris. they've recognized then that children were not the same as adults. why are we ostriches and have our head in the stand? you could excuse it up until the end of the second world war. people went straight from school and work probably of the age of 14 and there was no choice. there was not at and between group. since the '50s, since all this, since my age group, what is the bloody excuse? [laughter] all i can say is, i think this is something you will do in your country very quickly, because what i love about america is the thing, we can do this, we will do it, we will make it work and we will donate. these are your teenagers. they need your support. they are your community and they are your future. you deserve to have it better. [applause] >> i just have one or two. what inspired you to set up the teenager and young adult cancer center? why there? >> mainly because i was doing a charity show and someone's back garden. rebecca was doing it for autism. and another teenage program. at that party dr. david f
, then you can go to paris proved pool of people who want to come into the job and they can come in and do the job for a certain amount of time. and then you have to offer that job again to someone, if an american worker does not want it, then you let come you give it to someone else. it's also in our enlightened self interest to cover his immigration reform. i would want to can encourage you to go to the council on foreign relations website and see the task force report. it was co-chaired by jeb bush and mac mcwhirter. that points out the country is going to lead the world in the 21st century economically is going to be the country that can amass the largest mass of brain power. no matter where it was born. to do its research in its country. we started off with a head start because we're a nation of immigrants. but their other countries that are competing with us. anybody who gets a ph.d and a hard science from american university. i don't care where they were born, we ought to staple a green card to their diploma. and encourage them to do the work here. if we want america to be a country
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)